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Paleo Detox Bath

Paleo Detox Bath


A Paleo Detox Bath is an amazingly natural way to pull toxins out of your body, absorb minerals topically via your skin, and soothe aches and pains through a gentle, natural process. A soothing mineral soak is a relatively cheap spa-like treatment you can do at home with simple ingredients you can buy in any drug-store or grocery store.

 

Epsom salts in the Paleo Detox Bath are made up of the naturally occurring mineral compound called magnesium sulfate. The magnesium and sulfate in the salt are well absorbed into the body via skin absorption while soaking. Unlike the GI distress (diarrhea) that can be caused by taking oral magnesium supplements, magnesium absorbed through the skin bypasses the digestive tract altogether and thus eliminates that possible side effect of oral use.

 

More than half of all Americans who have been eating a typical SAD (standard American diet) are deficient in magnesium (1), due to depletion of magnesium in crop soils (2) and lack of intake of magnesium rich foods. Magnesium plays an important role in over 300 bio-chemical processes in the body. It helps maintain normal nerve and muscle function, keeps the heart rhythm normal and is needed for tooth and bone health. It assists with formation of brain tissue and joint proteins and can help strengthen the lining of the digestive tract and thus enable enhanced nutrient absorption.

 

Taking a Paleo Detox Bath that includes Epsom salt, helps restore magnesium and sulfate to your system since these minerals can be absorbed easily and efficiently through your skin, while you soak. Those with known gut lining problems, who may have nutrient absorption issues, may find a soak to be an ideal method for adequate intake of magnesium and sulfate. Some doctors recommend soaking three times per week for about 15 to 25 minutes. If you’re wondering where to find Epsom salt, just check out your local grocery store, health food store, pharmacy or agricultural supply store.

 

The baking soda in the recipe helps sooth and soften chapped, dry or irritated skin and aids in the relaxation of tension in muscles and joints.


 

paleo_detox_bath

Alfred Stevens (The Bath), Public Domain (Wikimedia Commons)

 

Paleo Detox Bath

 

  • 3  cups Epsom salt
  • 1  cup  baking soda
  • bathtub full of hot water

 

 

 


 

A good 20 – 30 minutes of soaking will give your body the chance to absorb the nutrients while at the same time,  flush away toxins as it sweats them out. Soaking longer is fine too. I just stay in the tub until the water becomes tepid, approximately 40 minutes.

 

There are skeptics out there who claim that there is no benefit to an Epsom salt Paleo Detox Bath. I always go by my own first hand experience. Any time I have muscle aches (like after a hard workout) or arthritic pain, I soak in a detox bath with the above recipe. Afterward, and continuing into the following days, there is a noticeable lessening of the aches, especially the arthritis pain. I have done a soak with plain water as a comparison and not felt any pain relief. Yes, I felt relaxed after the bath, but the aches and arthritic pain were unchanged. With the minerals in the bath, I feel a big difference. Go by your own experience and ignore those who try to use their “expertise” to tell you why something should or shouldn’t work for you. (It will be good practice for when you are told, that eating lots of “heart healthy whole grains” is good for you.)

 

Tip:  a very economical source for buying Epsom salt in bulk is from any local agricultural supply store.

 

Keep room temperature lemon or lime water in a glass next to your tub, to sip on while you are soaking. Room temperature is soothing and the lemon/lime will help with the flushing out of toxins and healthy alkaline hydration of your system. Make time to enjoy a Paleo Detox Bath whenever you feel overstressed, have overdone some physical work or exercise or have ventured off into poor eating habits and want to get back on the paleo band wagon!

 

 

(1) http://www.epsomsaltcouncil.org/health/

(2) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19013359